BLTC Press Titles


available for Kindle at Amazon.com


Mortal Coils

Aldous Huxley


Letters on the Aesthetical Education of Man

Friedrich Schiller


The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

A. Conan Doyle


Theory of Colours

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


A dog day

by Walter Lewis Emanuel

Excerpt:

Have no appetite.

8.35. Ate kittens' breakfast.

8.36. An affair with the cat (the kittens' mother). But I soon leave her, as the coward does not fight

fair, using claws.

9.0. Washed by Mary.

A hateful business. Put into a tub, and rubbed all over—mouth, tail, and everywhere—with filthy soapy water, that loathsome cat looking on all the while, and sneering in her dashed superior way. I don't know, I am sure, why the hussy should be so conceited. She has to clean herself. I keep a servant to clean me. At the same time I often wish I was a black dog. They keep clean so much longer. Every fingermark shows up so frightfully on the white part of me. I am a sight after Cook has been stroking me.

9.30. Showed myself in my washed state to the family. All very nice to me. Quite a triumphal entry, in fact. It is simply wonderful the amount of kudos I've got from that incident with the man. Miss Brown

(whom I rather like) particularly enthusiastic. Kissed me again and again, and called me "a dear, clean, brave, sweet-smelling little doggie." 9.40. While a visitor was being let in at the front-door I rushed out, and had the most glorious roll in the mud. Felt more like my old

self then.

9.45. Visited the family again. Shrieks of horror on seeing me caked in mud. But all agreed that I was not to be scolded to-day as I was a hero (over the man!). All, that is, except Aunt Brown, whose hand, for some reason or other, is always against me—though nothing is too good for the cat. She stigmatised me, quite gratuitously, as "a horrid

fellow."

50. Glorious thought! Rushed upstairs and rolled over and over on the old maid's bed. Thank Heaven, the mud was still wet!

10 to Wagged tail.

10.15.

10.16. Down into kitchen. While Cook is watching regiment pass, I play with chops, and bite big bits out of them. Cook, who is quite upset for the day by seeing so many soldiers, continues to cook the chops without noticing. 10.20 Dozed, to

Ate kittens' dinner.

1.20. Attacked by beast of cat again. She scratched my hind-leg, and at that I refused to go on. Mem.: to take it out of her kittens later.

i 1.25. Upstairs into dining-room.

Family not finished lunch yet. Young Mr. Brown throws a bread pellet at me, hitting me on the nozzle. An insult. I swallow the insult. Then I go up to Miss Brown and look at her with my great pleading eyes. I guessed it: they are irresistible. She gives me a piece of pudding. Aunt Brown tells her she shouldn't. At which, with great pluck, Miss Brown tells her to mind her own business. I admire that girl more and more.

1.30. A windfall. A whole dish of mayonnaise fish on the slab in the hall. Before you can say Jack Robinson I have bolted it.

1.32. Curious pains in my underneath.

1.33, Pains in my underneath get

worse.

1.34. Horrid feeling of sickness. 1.35. Rush up into Aunt Brown's room, and am sick there.

1.37.

Better.

r. Think I shall pull through if I am careful. Almost well again. Quite well again. Thank

1.40. 1.41.

Heavens! It was a narrow shave that time. People ought not to

1.42. Up into dining-room. And, to show how well I am, I gallumph round and round the room, at full pelt, about twenty times, steering myself by my tail. Then, as a grand finale, I jump twice on to the waistcoat-part of old Mr. Brown, who is sleeping peacefully in the arm-chair. He wakes up very angry indeed, and uses words I have never heard before. Even Miss Brown, to my no little surprise, says it is very naughty of me. Old Mr. Brown insists on my being punished, and orders Miss Brown to beat me. Miss

leave such stuff about.

Brown runs the burglar for all he is worth. But no good. Old Mr. Brown is dead to all decent feeling! So Miss Brown beats me. Verynice. Thoroughly enjoyable. Just like being patted. But, of course, I yelp, and pretend it hurts frightfully, and do the sad-eye business, and she soon leaves off and takes me into the next room and gives me six pieces of sugar! Good business. Must remember always to do this. Before leaving she kisses me and explains that I should not have jumped on poor Pa, as he is the man who goes to the City to earn bones for me. Something in that, perhaps. Nice girl.


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