BLTC Press Titles


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The Secret Doctrine, Volume II Anthropogenesis

H. P. Blavatsky


The Fairy Tale of the Green Snake and the Beautiful Lily

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Thomas Carlyle, Rudolf Steiner


Esoteric Buddhism

A. P. Sinnett


Darby O'Gill and the Little People

Hermenie Templeton Kavanagh


A second walk through Wales ...

by Richard Warner

Excerpt:

would subtraft from the venerable age of dur road nearly one hundred years. It was not for-us puisne antiquaries to discuss points ort which the great masters of the school had so. materially differed ; instead, therefore, of wasting our time in forming conjeftures that never could be ascertained, we were busied in admiring the beauties which the road presented to us. For some miles it exhibits very pleasing scenery. To the right the view is bounded by the romantick hills that rise gently from the banks of the river Usk; the stream itself, meandering through the rich and abundant valley to which it gives name, is a beautiful feature in this variegated prospeft, which is further diversified by the little village of Llanvair, and its ivied castle, seen partially through the noble woods that surround them. A wide scene lies open to the left: the coast of Somersetshire, • the river Severn, and the extensive tra£l of flat ground that runs for many miles to the westward along its northern banks. This was formerly caljed the moor, and has more than once suffered all the evils of an inundation. The last and most dreadful accident of this kind happened in the year 1607, wnen " the Severn ** sea, after a spring-tide, having before been

"driven back by a south-west wind, (which "continued without intermission for three "days,) and then again repulsed by a very for* "cible sea-wind, rose to such a high and vio*' lent tide, as to overflow all this lower tracl, "and also that of Somersetshire over-against "it, throwing down several houses, and over"whelming .a considerable number of cattle "and men."*

As we approached Caerleon, our prospeft became more extensive, and objects of curiosity multiplied upon us. Near the eighth milestone from Newport, the sign of the Rock and Fountain

"Invites to short refreshment, and to taste
"What grateful beverage the house may yield
'" After fatigue, or dusty heat."

We availed ourselves of its invitation; and having taken a slight repast, ascended the hill which rises immediately opposite to it. It is lofty and abrupt, and was formerly strengthened by a castle, called Penhaugh Castle, one of the fortified residences of the St. Maurs, ancestors of the Seymour family. The view from this elevation is extremely fine, but few other ad

; ■ , 1

f Camden, 715. edit. 1722.

vantages seem to have attended the situation of the ruined mansion, since it was compleatly commanded by a still higher hill to the south.

The road which for several miles has been rising, though gradually and insensibly, affords at every step prospers rich and diversified. They now, indeed, begin to partake of the grand, retaining at the same time their charafter of the beautiful. To the north, the vale of Usk still displays itself, smiling with cultivation, watered by its sinuous stream, and bounded by a line of mountains, amongst which the ragged head of the Skirid Vawr, near Abergavenny, makes a conspicuous figure. On the south, the Bristol Channel presents a magnificent sheet of water, studded with islands, the greater and lesser Holmes, and Barry island ; the distant hills of Somersetshire and Devonshire finishing the view towards that point.

Being desirous of visiting the loftily-situated village of Christ-Church, we left the tieiv road to Caerleon on our right, (which has of late years been formed for the convenience of carriages, in order that they may avoid the steep descent from Christ-Church into the valley,) and took the old way through the village. The elevation in the country, occasioned by an imperceptible rise for a considerable distance, here terminates in a sudden and abrupt manner, and on the brow of this descent the village of Christ-Church is seated. It has little to boast, save the beauty of its prospecl, which a very lofty situation enables it to command. An old and curious flat sepulchral stone occurs in, , the church, rudely indented with the figures of a man and woman, separated by a cross ; the inscription running round the margin of it is cut in barbarous letters, and baffled all our attempts to give a compleat transcription of it; you haveas much at we were able to make out:


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