BLTC Press Titles


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The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas


The Fairy Tale of the Green Snake and the Beautiful Lily

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Thomas Carlyle, Rudolf Steiner


Paradoxes of the Highest Science

Eliphas Levi


Theory of Colours

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


A tour in Scotland 1769

by Thomas Pennant

Excerpt:

end affetfionate Friend,

Down-tng,

-Ctftbraoth,niu THOMAS PENNANT.

A

T O U R

I N

S COTLAND,

MDCCLXIX.

ON Monday the 26th of June, take my departure from Chists*. Chester, a city without parallel for the singular structure of the four principal streets, which are as if excavated out of the earth, and sunk many feet beneath the surface; the carriages drive far beneath the level of the kitchens, on a line with ranges of shops, over which on each side of the streets passengers walk from end to end, in galleries open in front, secure from wet or heat. The back courts of all these houses are level with the ground, but to go into any of these four streets it is necessary to descend a flight of several steps.

The Cathedral is an antient structure, very ragged on the outside,

B from

from the nature of the red friable stone * with which it is built: the tabernacle work in the choir is very neat; but the beauty and elegant simplicity of a Very antique gothic chapter-house, is what merits a visit from every traveller.

The Hypocaust near the Feathers Inn, is one of the remains of the Romans +, it being well known that this place was a principal station. Among many antiquities found here, none is more singular than the rude sculpture of the Dea Armigcra Minerva, with her bird and her altar, on the face of a rock in a small field near the Welch end of the bridge.

The castle is a decaying pile. The walls of the city, the only complete specimens of antient fortifications, are kept in excellent order, being the principal walk of the inhabitants: the views from the several parts are very fine; the mountains of Flintshire, the hills of Broxton, and the insulated rock of Beeston, form the ruder part of the scenery; a rich flat forms the softer view, and the prospect up the river towards Boughton recalls in some degree the idea of the Thames and Richmond hill.

Pasted through Tarvin, a small village; in the church-yard is an epitaph in memory of Mr. John Thomasen, an excellent penman, but particularly famous for his exact and elegant imitation of the Creek character.

Delamere, which Leland calls a faire and large sorest, with plenty of redde deere and falow, is now a black and dreary waste; it.feeds

* Saxum arenarium friabile rnbrum. Da Costa, FoJstU. I. 139. \ This city was the Dc-va and Devana of Antonine, and the station of the Ltgio •vice/ima vieTrix.

a few

a few rabbets, and a few black Terns* skim over the splashes that water some part of it.

A few miles from this heath lies Northwich, a small town, long Salt Pit*. famous for its rock salr, and brine pits. Some years ago I visited one of the mines; the stratum of salt lies about forty yards deep; that which I saw was hollowed into the form of a temple. I descended thro' a dome, and found the roof supported by rows of pillars, about two yards thick, and several in height; the whole was illuminated with numbers of candles, and made a most magnificent and glittering appearance. Above the salt is a bed of whitish clay-f-, used in making the Liverpool earthen-ware; and in the same place is also dug a good deal of the Gypsum, or plaister stone. The fossil salt is generally yellow, and semipellucid, sometimes debased with a dull greenish earth, and is often found, but in small quantities, quite clear and colorless.

The road from this place to Macclesfield is thro' a flat, rich, but unpleasant country. That town is in a very flourishing state; is possessed of a great manufacture of mohair and twist buttons; has between twenty and thirty silk mills, and a very considerable copper smelting house, and brass work.


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