BLTC Press Titles


available for Kindle at Amazon.com


The Revolt of the Netherlands

Friedrich Schiller


The Worm Ouroboros

E. R. Eddison


Theory of Colours

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe


Novalis Including Hymns to the Night

Novalis, George MacDonald, Thomas Carlyle


An historical sketch of the French revolution of 1848

by French revolution, 1848

Excerpt:

SECTION VI.

DISSOLUTION OF TIIE CHAMBER.—PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT.

The Duchesse d'Orleans in the Chamber.—Stormy Opposition. — Odillon Barrot, Ledru Rollin, Lamar tine, &c.-—Brutish Violence of the Mob. — Departure of the Duchesse. — A Provisional Government proposed.—The Last Sitting of the Chamber.—Louis Philippe and the Charter.—Formation of the Provisional Government at the Hotel de Ville. — Proclamation of the Republic.—Decrees.—Abolition of Capital Punishments for Political Offences.—Lamartine and the Communists. — Return of Tranquillity. — Catastrophe at the Chateau de Neuilly.—Inscription on the Column of July.— Obsequies of the Martyrs 45

SECTION VII.

THE MEMBERS OF THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT.

Dupont de l'Eure. — Lamartine.—Cremieux.—Arago.—Ledru Rollin.—Gamier Pages.—Marie.—Marrast.—Louis Blanc.— Flocon.—Albert.—Miscellaneous Remarks 52

SECTION VIII.

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY.

Decree for the Election of Members.—Circular to Foreign Courts. —Deputations. — Unauthorized Act of M. Ledru Rollin.— Scene in the Hall.—Revolt of the National Guards.—Blanqui's Plot to subvert the Government.—Grand Fete of Fraternity. —Commencement of the Elections.—Composition of the National Assembly.—Imposing Demonstration on the Meeting of that Body.—Senatorial Costume.—Election of President, &c. 59

HISTORICAL SKETCH

OF THE

FEENCH REVOLUTION

OF 1848.

SECTION I.

RETROSPECTIVE AND INTRODUCTORY.

Suddenness of the Explosion.—The " Charivari."— State of French Parties.—Duration of Guizot's Ministry.—The Army, National Guard, &c.—Accelerating Causes of the Revolution.—Carbonari. —Prosecutions of the Press.—Fortifications.—Increase of Expenditure.—Taxation.—Corruption.—Spanish Marriages.—Government of Algeria.—Electoral Reform.—Reform Banquets.—Opening of the Chambers.—The King's Speech.—The Address.—Conduct of the Opposition.

The French Revolution of 1848, the most sudden in its explosion, the most rapid in its progress and termination—at least so far as the extinction of the Orleans dynasty is concerned—of any revolution upon record, has been, and continues to be, the astonishment of Europe. It took every body by surprise ; not only in England, not only all over the continent, but even in France. Yet it came not altogether unexpectedly : its advent had been confidently predicted ; its arrival was, by many, regarded as a certainty. The volcanic elements of revolution had long been seething; but the outburst was not looked for so early, so instantaneously. It was accelerated by fortuitous events. The rapidity of its consummation is forcibly, though too ludicrously pictured, considering the gravity of the subject, in the following passage from the Charivari, a French periodical ranking with the English Punch:—"In 1793, the first King that was dethroned inspired uneasiness, and he was guillotined. In 1830, the second King whom the people deposed was escorted to the sea-side, and a strict watch kept over him until he had set sail from the shores of la belle France. In 1848, the people treat the ex-King with sublime disdain—they give themselves no trouble whatever concerning him. The King goes whithersoever he will; no one looks after him, no pains are even taken to ascertain if he does go or not. A few days afterwards some report that he is dead, and the reply is ' Ha!' Others affirm that the poor devil is very well, and the reply is still ' Ha!' No one cares to be assured whether he be dead or alive. As little uneasiness is felt as though he had never been in existence. Is it possible to suppress a King and a whole dynasty more completely, or with greater generosity ? Let us trace the steps of the declining scale :—The movement of 1789 lasted three years. That which resulted in the Restoration lasted three months. The Revolution of 1830 lasted three days. The Revolution of 1848 lasted three hours."


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