BLTC Press Titles


available for Kindle at Amazon.com


Tao Te Ching

Lao Tzu, James Legge (trans.)


The Story of Doctor Dolittle

Hugh Lofting


Mortal Coils

Aldous Huxley


Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman


Garibaldi at home: notes of a visit to Caprera

by Charles Rhoderick McGrigor (sir, bart.)

Excerpt:

VI PREFACE.

way to the Straits of Bonifacio, have made impressions on his mind which he is anxious to preserve in all their original distinctness, uneffaced and even unimpaired by the hand of time; and this desire was the motive which induced him to write a short narrative of his excursion.

The author's journey was not altogether of a private nature. The subscribers in London and its environs for a yacht to the ex-Dictator of Naples deputed him to proceed last winter to Caprera, as the bearer of their request that the noble inhabitant of that island would be pleased to accept their present. To cross the Alps, the Apennines, and the ocean for such a purpose was an agreeable duty to the present writer; and the recollection of that journey will be rendered still more pleasing to him if the following brief narrative should prove acceptable to his readers.

CHAPTER I.

A SUITABLE MARK OF ESTEEM FOR GARIBALDI—DETERMINATION TO PRESENT HIM WITH A YACHT—COMMENCEMENT OF MY JOURNEY TO ITALY —CALAIS TO PARIS BY RAILWAY—THE RUES CASTIGLIONE AND RIVOLI—RAILWAY FROM PARIS TO ST. MICHEL—MA(;ON—LAMARTINE —THE CHARMS OF NATURE—SAVOY—ALPINE SCENERY—THOUGHTS SUGGESTED BY THE SCENES THROUGH WHICH I PASSED—MY COMPANIONS ACROSS THE PASS OF MONT CENIS—THE ARC—SUSA—FROM TURIN TO GENOA—ASTI—GENOA LA SUPERBA—THE CHURCH OF THE ANNUNZIATA—NATURE AND ART—LEGHORN—SECURE- A PASSAGE FOR THE MADDALENA—ON BOARD THE "UMBRIA "—CAPRAJA—AN ITALIAN PROFESSOR—CAPO DELL' ORSO, AND OTHER ISLANDS—THE PROGENITORS OF GARIBALDI—ARRIVAL AT CAPRERA.

CHAPTER I.

TN the year 1864, some of General Garibaldi's innumerable admirers decided on presenting to him a suitable mark of their esteem. Perhaps their chief difficulty consisted in the General's wellknown aversion to receive even the semblance of a reward, or to lie under any personal obligation for the great benefits which he had bestowed on millions. If, therefore, the intended present should be one of magnitude, it would doubtless be refused. Fortunately it was decided to offer him a wellbuilt and fast-sailing yacht of fifty tons. By his acceptance of such a present, the lofty spirit of Garibaldi could suffer no abatement of dignity. By his refusal of it, the feelings of his disinterested admirers would be wounded; and from giving this unnecessary pain, the gentle spirit of Garibaldi would naturally recoil. As to his tastes, they are

4 A PRESENT TO GARIBALDI.

maritime. As to his abode in Caprera, that island is only five miles long and two broad. There are numerous islands in its vicinity, but between Caprera and those islands scarcely any communication exists. In such a place of abode, a vessel must be far more necessary than a carriage would be in many other places. In short, the present was in every way suitable and appropriate. I shared so little in the labour or trouble connected with this present, that I can afford to praise it without the imputation of prejudice or vanity. On me devolved only the pleasing and easy duty of going out to Caprera with two addresses. Certainly my equanimity was destroyed before going, by seeing repeatedly in print the news, as it was called, that Garibaldi had refused the yacht. There was fortunately at Caprera an English Colonel, who held a good position in England, and also a good place in the General's esteem. Therefore, I comforted myself with thinking that the English Colonel would eradicate from the General's mind the effects of all erroneous representations about the yacht. As for the Alps in November and December, the

DEPARTURE FROM LONDON. 5

passage of them would be bracing, invigorating, and altogether delightful. But here, lest it should escape me, let me remark that I have seen far more snow in Italy than in England this winter. Snow was rarely out of my sight after quitting England, and cold indeed were the gusts of wind from the Alps, the Apennines, and the Corsican mountains.


... from the RetroRead library, using Google Book Search, and download any of the books already converted to Kindle format.

Browse the 100 most recent additions to the RetroRead library

Browse the library alphabetically by title

Make books:

Login or register to convert Google epubs to Kindle ebooks

username:

password:

Lost your password?

Not a member yet? Register here, and convert any Google epub you wish


Powerd by Calibre powered by calibre