BLTC Press Titles


available for Kindle at Amazon.com


Further Adventures of an Irish R. M.

Edith Somerville and Martin Ross


The Haunted Bookshop

Christopher Morely


The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde


My Man Jeeves

P. G. Wodehouse


La cuisine creole

by Lafcadio Hearn

Excerpt:

COfeD flGATS AND HOW TO S6HV6 THe/Vl.

TO SERVE PICKLED OYSTERS.

Take them from the pickle jar, put them into a glass dish, and ornament it with the tender, delicate leaves of celery and parsley. Serve with bread and butter sandwiches.

TO SERVE MEAT OR CHICKEN PIE.

Lay a fringed napkin in a waiter or plate larger than the dish in which the pie is baked; set the pie on it; turn up the edges of the napkin against it, and put sprigs of parsley or delicate green leaves of celery on the edge of the plate to keep the napkin in place.

A NICE WAY TO SERVE COLD MEAT.

Cut cold roast beef in slices, put gravy enough to cover them, add two tablespoonfuls of wine or catsup. If there is not enough gravy, make more by putting hot water and a good bit of butter, with a spoonful of browned flour. Let it stew gently. If liked, a sliced leek with a bunch of parsley may be added. Serve mashed potatoes with it. This is equal to beef a-lamode.

GLAZING FOR TONGUE, HAMS, ETC.

Boil a shin of beef and a knuckle of veal for twelve hours in three or four quarts of water. Put in spices, herbs, and vegetables, the same as for soup; keep it boiling till it is reduced to a quart, then strain through a sieve and put away for use. This makes fine gravies, and is extremely useful to finish off baked hams, tongues, and cold roasts.

BRAISED TONGUE WITH ASPIC JELLY.

Boil the tongue until tender, then place it in a stewpan with two onions, a head of celery, four cloves, and salt and pepper; cover it with the liquor it was boiled in; add to it a glass of brandy, a tablespoonf ul of sugar, a blade of mace, a bunch of thyme, and a bunch of parsley. Let it simmer gently for two hours. Take out the tongue, strain the liquor it was boiled in, and add to it a box of Cox's gelatine which has been soaked in a goblet of cold water. Heat it and pour over the tongue. Serve cold.

SEASONING FOR SAUSAGE MEAT.

Chop up and run your sausage meat through the cutter, and to every pound of the ground meat, allow a tablespoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of mixed black and red pepper, a quarter of a teaspoonful of saltpetre, and a half cup of sage and sweet marjoram. If you prefer it you may substitute for the sage some thyme and summer savory.

SEASONING FOB STUFFING VEAL, PIG OB TURKEY.

When much seasoning is required it is well to keep it prepared on hand. It should always be kept well stopped. Dry a pound of salt; grind an ounce of white or black pepper; dry and powder two ounces of thyme and one of sweet marjoram; grate one ounce of nutmeg, and mix with half a pound of bread crumbs dried in a ,

slow oven, three eggs, a quarter of a pound of butter or suet, and a cup of finely chopped parsley.

LIVER AND HAM FORCEMEAT FOR STUFFING.

Take a calf's liver, or the livers of three or four turkeys, or geese; lay them in cold water, till ready to use them; cut with them the same quantity of fat ham or bacon; throw them into a saucepan, and let them fry a good brown; season with salt, pepper, spices, chopped mushrooms, parsley and three shallots. When soft, chop them fine, or else pass them through a sausage grinder. This receipt can be used for raised pies, or, as an addition to turkey stuffing.

AROMATIC SPICES FOR SEASONING MEAT PIES, ETC.

Take an ounce each of mace and nutmeg, two ounces of cloves, two of pepper corns (whole pepper will do), marjoram and thyme, each one ounce, bay leaves half an ounce. Dry the herbs well first; put the spices and herbs in a paper closely folded, to keep in the aroma, and place them in a slow oven to dry for an hour, or two; then pound and sift them, through a sieve. Cork tightly.

TRUFFLES AND CHESTNUT STUFFING FOR A PIG.

Many persons like truffles for stuffing for a roast pig; they should be mixed with fat bacon, livers of veal or fowl, sweet herbs, pepper, salt and butter. Chestnut stuffing is prepared by roasting sixty chestnuts. Remove their hulls while hot, and pound them fine, add four ounces of butter, run this through a sieve, and add to it a few green onions, pr chives, sweet basil, parsley and thyme; grate in a nutmeg, put in pepper and salt, and bind it, with three eggs. Stuff the pig with it and serve with tomato sauce.


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