BLTC Press Titles


available for Kindle at Amazon.com


Tao Te Ching

Lao Tzu, James Legge (trans.)


Darby O'Gill and the Little People

Hermenie Templeton Kavanagh


Some Experiences of an Irish R. M.

Edith Somerville and Martin Ross


The Worm Ouroboros

E. R. Eddison


Liverpool and slavery

by Genuine "Dicky Sam."

Excerpt:

'I

An Historical Account of the Liverpool-African Slave Trade.

WAS IT THE CAUSE OF THE PROSPERITY OF THE TOWHT

COMPILED FROM VARIOUS SSdUACES AND AUTHENTIC DOCUMENTS.
; .". . C<7B<ai<M$£~ " -' ; ;

The Ships' Names, Masters, Owners—Where Bound—
Tons—Numbers of Slaves on each Ship, and Time
of Sailing for the Year 1799—Also, the Names of
the Liverpool-African Merchants' Company (from the
valuable papers of the late John Backhouse, Esq.,
Wavertree)—Complete List of Ships which left the
Port of Liverpool for Africa from 1709 to 1807—

WITH AN INTERESTING PLATE OF THE FAMOUS

SLAVE SHIP THE "BROOKES" OF LIVERPOOL;

Showing Her Living Cargoe Packed For The Voyage.
Together with.

Numerous Anecdotes—Life Of Huch Crow, The Liverpool Slave Captain, &o.

BY A GENUINE "DICKY SAM."

"Get Slaves honestly. If you can,
And if you cannot get them honestly,
Get them."—Old Saying.

LIVERPOOL:

A, BOWKER & SON, BOOKSELLERS, 27, RENSHAW STREET.

1884.

The Edition is limited to 500 Copies.All Rights Reserved.

PREFACE.

N offering to the public this little work, entitled " Liverpool and Slavery," the author, in so doing, wishes to make an apology, if such is necessary. His object is simply to present to the reader of local history an account of the Slave Trade in the last century, as it affected Liverpool. Nothing personal of any kind is intended to individuals, but to take a general survey of the Slave Trade, and the results it produced. The over fastidious need not point the finger of scorn to the merchants of those days, for to them the Slave Trade was legitimate; slavery was in fashion, and it was the Eldorado of the period. To those, if any there are, who would sneer at the trade, and the wealth it created, I need only remind such, that in all probability, had they lived then, they would gladly have been partakers of the gold it brought. Nor yet, must it be understood, that I defend the Slave Trade, far from it; it was a traffic so vile, so replete with the worst of crimes, it was the blackest stain on poor humanity. I cannot find words to fully express my abhorrence of the traffic, and my reason for appearing before the public, is merely to produce the facts of the Slave Trade as it was in Liverpool. At a conversazione, during the past winter, a chat on slavery was going on, London and Bristol were severely rated for the part they took in the trade. I thought of Liverpool and its prowess in the same direction. One of my opponents argued very strongly in favour of privateering, smuggling, and wrecking, or, as it was popularly called, the " wracking harvest." Tradition says, it was not uncommon to wind up the prayers in the church with, " God send us a wreck before morning." A good story is told of a certain parson, when news of a wreck was brought to the villagers, while at church, the congregation were making haste to leave, when the preacher shouted, " Nay, nay, my friends, not so fast, let's all start fair." But these things are of the past, the night is over, and bright day has dawned; the change from wrong to right is of slow growth, false lights are no longer lighted on the shores to allure the ill-fated ships; sailors are not kidnapped, and the negroes are admitted to their right of freedom. All changes which help to make life worth living, and the pathway easy to do right, should be welcomed by all humanitarians. Liverpool, once the little, now the emporium of the world; her men of commerce princes among their fellows; and, though the stains of the Slave Trade cannot be wiped out, the call for help is never made in vain.


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